You’re all Buddhas, pretending not to be. You’re all the Christ, pretending not to be. You’re all Atman, pretending not to be. You’re all love, pretending not to be. You’re all one, pretending not to be. You’re all Gurus, pretending not to be. You’re all God, pretending not to be. When you’re ready to stop pretending, then you’re ready to just be the real you. That’s your home.

Marcus Thomas (via panatmansam)

The innocent mistake that keeps us caught in our own particular style of ignorance, unkindness, and shut-downness is that we are never encouraged to see clearly what is, with gentleness. Instead, there’s a kind of basic misunderstanding that we should try to be better than we already are, that we should try to improve ourselves, that we should try to get away from painful things, and that if we could just learn how to get away from the painful things, then we would be happy. That is the innocent, naive misunderstanding that we all share, which keeps us unhappy.

This is not an improvement plan; it is not a situation in which you try to be better than you are now. It is something much softer and more openhearted than any of that. It involves learning how, once you have fully acknowledged the feeling of anger and the knowledge of who you are and what you do, to let it go. So whether it’s anger or craving or jealousy or fear or depression—whatever it might be—the notion is not to try to get rid of it, but to make friends with it. That means getting to know it completely, with some kind of softness, and learning how, once you’ve experienced it fully, to let go.

Pema Chodron (via lazyyogi)